‘She Kills Monsters’ review: D&D based play brings all the feels

Emma Olson, Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Linfield Theatre recently presented “She Kills Monsters,” a play about Dungeons & Dragons, sisterhood, being queer, and the 90s. This eclectic mix of topics came together to form a brilliant show.

Although Dungeons & Dragons and nerd culture played a large role in the plot of this play, you didn’t need to know anything about the game to understand the play. The script did a good job of explaining what audience needed to know by having characters explain the basics of the game to Agnes, the protagonist.

The cast did a spectacular job of portraying the characters. Some actors even had to play two versions of the same character: a kid and their Dungeons & Dragons persona. These characters were portrayed excellently, with enough differences between the two to make them distinguishable, but enough similarities that it was clear the characters were related.

One of the most notable things about this play were the costumes. The human characters were all dressed down in perfect 90s casual, while their Dungeons & Dragons personas were fitted with everything from a TV-obsessed demon’s punk-rock attire to a sexy elf’s skimpy dress.

The costumes were just as imperative as the set to build the world of “She Kills Monsters,” if not more so. The set rarely changed and was more of a static prop than anything, while the costumes showed what was really happening.

An important theme in the play was diversity, specifically regardling the LGBTQ community. Agnes’ sister, Tilly, was a lesbian, but Agnes didn’t know that until after she died because the two weren’t close. The play examines how Tilly’s identity affected her at school and in life.

“She Kills Monsters” knew how to make the audience laugh, cry, and feel nostalgic all in a couple hours. Funny references from the 1990s and jokes about the emerging internet were prominent, but the heartwarming sisterly moments were bittersweet with reminders that Tilly was dead for the majority of the play.

This performance was another success from Linfield theatre.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email