Choir represents unity in spring concert

Hannah Curry, Staff Writer

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This year’s spring choir concert called “We Are One” represented unity, togetherness, and one voice. The singers performed a variety of songs from different styles, eras, and composers.

The concert started out with Wildcats Men’s Glee singing “The Longest Time” by Billy Joel. Following that, the students performed “Misty Mountains” from “The Hobbit” and “Sisi Ni Moja (We are one)” to follow the theme of the concert.

“My favorite part of Men’s Glee is the way that we’re all there to support each other, and the brotherhood that we’ve created,” freshman Calder Ifft said.

Men’s Glee was then joined by Cascara Voce, formally known as Women’s Ensemble, to sing a choral medley from “West Side Story.” The men got the chance to sing “I Feel Pretty” and the whole ensemble ended with “Somewhere”.

Cascara Voce got their new name this year during a retreat the women went on in March. Senior Chloe Switzer told the story of how they got their new name and said they decided on changing it because “we were closer than we have ever been before.”

“I love singing in an all-female vocal ensemble. It’s really empowering and hearing all of our voices become one is so beautiful,” freshman Mara Youngren-Brown said.

“We all come from different backgrounds, are different ages and have different interests, but we can all come together and create beautiful music together, and I love that,” she said.

The women also sang a set of three songs, “Warrior” by Kim Baryluk, “High Flight” by Karen Linford Robinson and “Ffe Mwe, Mwe Ffe (They are us and we are them)” by Joan Szymko.

Finally, concert choir came out to perform their set. They started out with “Indodana” a traditional song in isiXhosa, a native language used in Zimbabwe.

A brief intermission in between songs allowed the organist, harp player and percussionist to set up for concert choir’s three part Psalm.

The concert concluded with “Make Our Garden Grow” from “Candide,” a 1955 operetta by Leonard Bernstein.

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Choir represents unity in spring concert